thatawkwardwritingmoment
Think of the novels you have loved most. Do you remember a character who lived with page after page, perhaps hoping the book would never end? What do you remember most clearly, the characters or the plot? Now think of the movies you’ve seen that affected you the most. Do you remember the actors or the plot? There’s a book called Characters Make Your Story that you don’t have to read because the title says it all: Characters make your story. If the people come alive, what they do becomes the story.
Sol Stein
amandaonwriting
amandaonwriting:

Literary Birthday - 10 April
Happy Birthday, Paul Theroux, born 10 April 1941
12 Paul Theroux Quotes
Fiction gives us a second chance that life denies us.
I can’t predict how reading habits will change. But I will say that the greatest loss is the paper archive - no more a great stack of manuscripts, letters, and notebooks from a writer’s life, but only a tiny pile of disks, little plastic cookies where once were calligraphic marvels.
Mark Twain was a great traveler and he wrote three or four great travel books. I wouldn’t say that I’m a travel novelist but rather a novelist who travels - and who uses travel as a background for finding stories of places.
Many aspects of the writing life have changed since I published my first book, in the 1960s. It is more corporate, more driven by profits and marketing, and generally less congenial - but my day is the same: get out of bed, procrastinate, sit down at my desk, try to write something.
Reading alters the appearance of a book. Once it has been read, it never looks the same again, and people leave their individual imprint on a book they have read. Once of the pleasures of reading is seeing this alteration on the pages, and the way, by reading it, you have made the book yours.
The more you write, the more you’re capable of writing.
I know there are writers who feel unhappy with domesticity and who even manufacture domestic turmoil in order to have something to write about. With me, though, the happier I feel, the better I write.
A novel captures essence that is not possible in any other form.
Fiction writing, and the reading of it, and book buying, have always been the activities of a tiny minority of people, even in the most-literate societies.
I’m constantly running across people who have never heard of books I think they should read.
You can’t write about a friend, you can only write about a former friend.
Writing is pretty crummy on the nerves.
Theroux is an American travel writer and novelist. The Great Railway Bazaar is his most famous work of non-fiction. He is best known for his novel The Mosquito Coast. He is the father of British authors and documentary makers Louis Theroux and Marcel Theroux.

by Amanda Patterson for Writers Write

amandaonwriting:

Literary Birthday - 10 April

Happy Birthday, Paul Theroux, born 10 April 1941

12 Paul Theroux Quotes

  1. Fiction gives us a second chance that life denies us.
  2. I can’t predict how reading habits will change. But I will say that the greatest loss is the paper archive - no more a great stack of manuscripts, letters, and notebooks from a writer’s life, but only a tiny pile of disks, little plastic cookies where once were calligraphic marvels.
  3. Mark Twain was a great traveler and he wrote three or four great travel books. I wouldn’t say that I’m a travel novelist but rather a novelist who travels - and who uses travel as a background for finding stories of places.
  4. Many aspects of the writing life have changed since I published my first book, in the 1960s. It is more corporate, more driven by profits and marketing, and generally less congenial - but my day is the same: get out of bed, procrastinate, sit down at my desk, try to write something.
  5. Reading alters the appearance of a book. Once it has been read, it never looks the same again, and people leave their individual imprint on a book they have read. Once of the pleasures of reading is seeing this alteration on the pages, and the way, by reading it, you have made the book yours.
  6. The more you write, the more you’re capable of writing.
  7. I know there are writers who feel unhappy with domesticity and who even manufacture domestic turmoil in order to have something to write about. With me, though, the happier I feel, the better I write.
  8. A novel captures essence that is not possible in any other form.
  9. Fiction writing, and the reading of it, and book buying, have always been the activities of a tiny minority of people, even in the most-literate societies.
  10. I’m constantly running across people who have never heard of books I think they should read.
  11. You can’t write about a friend, you can only write about a former friend.
  12. Writing is pretty crummy on the nerves.

Theroux is an American travel writer and novelist. The Great Railway Bazaar is his most famous work of non-fiction. He is best known for his novel The Mosquito Coast. He is the father of British authors and documentary makers Louis Theroux and Marcel Theroux.

by Amanda Patterson for Writers Write

Vol. 13 MOMENTUM: Louis McGill - “Hypnic Jerk”

“‘Hypnic Jerk’ is a story about the momentum of life, and how it can
run off without you if you let it.”—Louis

***

It felt like a splash-down from a jump off the Golden Gate Bridge.

I woke up with a start after that half-asleep feeling like I was hurtling downward. At two in the morning, I still couldn’t get to sleep. My mind reeled after the past few days. Life felt like it was gaining speed, slipping away and I couldn’t hold on. Soon it may run off without me.

I sat up and picked a glass of water up off the bedside table.

Didn’t I just graduate yesterday? I thought.

No, that was at least two years ago, said that know-it-all little voice in the back of my head.

Quiet, I said.  I graduated, moved, moved again, left everything behind, and here I am. How long have I been here?

Nearly a year, now.

When did that happen?

Well, I guess it sort of crept up on us.

Smartass. I took a sip, set the glass back down, and tried to go back to sleep. I knew sleep wouldn’t come easy. It hadn’t for days, ever since this thought latched on to my psyche like a tick.

Well it’s not like you didn’t see this coming, the voice said.

She’s getting married, I said. Everyone’s getting married. Everyone’s having kids. Everyone’s moving on, and I’m halfway across the country from anyone I give a damn about.

Wah, wah, wah. You knew this would happen when you left.

I didn’t have much of a choice, now did I?

Sure you did. You had two choices: go or stay.

Like the Clash song.

Now who’s the smartass?

Read More

ANNOUNCEMENT! The Theme for Vol. 14 is “Power and Corruption”

Did you know Ink Well Mag is based in Chicago? As the Windy City reels from yet another tale of political corruption this week, we figured it was a timely moment to announce the theme for Volume 14: “Power and Corruption”.

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For this issue, show us what these big ideas inspire in you. Maybe important social or political causes come to mind. Maybe you want to draw awareness to a particular injustice. Or maybe there’s a powerful spark in your personal life that you want to explore. If life imitates art imitates life, as The Onion joked recently…why are you inspired to create works of art around these themes? What is the story you are trying to tell, the reaction you want to provoke, with your work? Send us your stuff. We want to hear from you.

We’re accepting submissions (click here for our very important guidelines  please) through Friday, March 29!

120 Seconds With…Dan Beatty

Dan is the author of "Roots".

  • Day job(s): Clinical Social Worker, Outpatient Therapist, Adjunct College Professor.
  • Three favorite authors: Kurt Vonnegut, Jr., Joyce Carol Oates, Mark Brazaitis; Honorable Mention: my 11-year daughter Kenzie Beatty.
  • Three artists you most admire: Bruce Springsteen, Bob Dylan, Vincent Van Gogh.
  • How have you changed as an artist since you started writing: I now can hardly read a good novel for pleasure, I am becoming more interested in their writing style than the plot. Hopefully, that won’t last forever.
  • Describe your dream studio/workplace: Isolation and beautiful scenery. This can be anywhere as long as these two elements are present
  • Where do you feel the most “at home”: When I’m with my wife and daughters, no matter where. And I love driving around my hometown of Chariton, Iowa since I have lived so far away for so long
  • Something you never leave the house without: A diet Mountain Dew
  • How do you unwind and get in the mood to create/write: isolation, a Newcastle beer, and music with great lyrics
  • Tell us about a favorite holiday/wintertime tradition: Going to get our tree with my wife and daughters the Saturday after Thanksgiving (LEAST favorite: trying to get said tree in the door and standing upright, which has yet to go smoothly)
  • Name the last song that got stuck in your head: As I write this, “Under Pressure” by Queen is stuck in my head. And that is OK.